Genealogy of the Islamic State: Reflections on Maududi’s Political Thought and Islamism

Ahmad, Irfan. 2010. “Genealogy of the Islamic State: Reflections on Maududi’s Political Thought and Islamism”.In. F. Osella and B. Soares (eds). Islam, Politics and Anthropology. Wiley-Blackwell & JRAI. 138-55.   Part of The Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute Special Issue Book Series, Islam, Politics, Anthropology offers critical reflections on past and current studies of Islam and politics in…

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The Indian Jamaat-e-Islami Reconsiders Secular Democracy

Ahmad, Irfan.  2009. “The Indian Jamaat-e-Islami Reconsiders Secular Democracy” In. Barbara D. Metcalf (ed.). Islam in South Asia in Practice: Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press: 447–456 This volume of Princeton Readings in Religions brings together the work of more than thirty scholars of Islam and Muslim societies in South Asia to create a rich anthology of primary…

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Genealogy of the Islamic State: Reflections on Maududi’s Political Thought and Islamism

Ahmad, Irfan. 2009a. “Genealogy of the Islamic State: Reflections on Maududi’s Political Thought and Islamism”.Journal of Royal Anthropological Institute (NS) 15: S145– S162. ABSTRACT: According to the conventional wisdom, there is no separation between religion and the state in Islam. Ernest Gellner thus asserted that Islam ‘was the state from the very start’. Most readings of ‘Islamic…

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Power, Purity and the Vanguard: Educational Ideology of the Jamaat-e-Islami of India

Ahmad, Irfan.  2008. “Power, Purity and the Vanguard: Educational Ideology of the Jamaat-e-Islami of India”. In. Jamal Malik (ed.). Madrasas in South Asia: Teaching Terror? London: Routledge: 142– 164.   After 9/11, madrasas have been linked to international terrorism. They are suspected to foster anti-western, traditionalist or even fundamentalist views and to train al-Qaeda fighters. This has led…

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Cracks in the ‘Mightiest Fortress’: Jamaat-e-Islami’s Changing Discourse on Women

Ahmad, Irfan. 2008. “Cracks in the ‘Mightiest Fortress’: Jamaat-e-Islami’s Changing Discourse on Women”.Modern Asian Studies42(2&3): 549–575. Abstract Islamists’ ideas about the position of women are readily invoked to portray them as ‘anti-modern’. The operating assumption is that Islamism (mutatis mutandis Islam) sanctions gender hierarchy. In this paper, drawing on ethnographic research and written sources of…

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The State in Islamist Thought

Ahmad, Irfan. 2006. “The State in Islamist Thought”.ISIM Review. 18 (Autumn): 12-13. Reproduced in WLUML Dossier 28 (December 2006): 35– 39. For a summary in Dutch “De Scheiding Tussen Moskee en Statat” Click here Abstract: The state became central to Islamism not because Islam theologically entailed it, but because of socio-political formations that developed in the early twentieth century.…

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Between Moderation and Radicalization: Transnational Interactions of Jamaat-e-Islami of India

Ahmad, Irfan.  2005. “Between Moderation and Radicalization: Transnational Interactions of Jamaat-e-Islami of India”. Global Networks: A Journal of Transnational Affairs. 5(3): 279– 299. Abstract Religious movements have often been studied in the context of nationstates. With scholarly attention now shifting to globalization and other world system processes, there is a growing move to go beyond the particularity…

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India-Pakistan: Friendship as Enmity

Ahmad, Irfan. 2003b. “India-Pakistan: Friendship as Enmity”. Economic and Political Weekly. 38 (31): 3231– 3233. Abstract: While one can barely deny the importance of the episode of Noor Fatima from Pakistan receiving medical treatment in Bangalore, an excavation into our mass psyche would perhaps reveal something extremely disturbing. Treating Fatima was not a usual apolitical medical practice.…

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Timothy McVeighs of the Orient

Ahmad, Irfan. 2002. “Timothy McVeighs of the Orient”. Economic and Political Weekly. 37 (15): 1399– 1400. Abstract: Timothy McVeigh and Osama bin Laden share common ground. The difference, if any, is that the terrorism of the former arises out of moral guilt whereas that of the latter stems from entrenched anger and a profound sense of…

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